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Mike Groth
09-15-2007, 01:49 PM
Here are 2 videos from todays workout. The first is 205x5 and the second 225x5 which was a PR. Please critique my form any advice/criticism is appreciated.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v476/bigmike8069/?action=view&current=40743a12.pbr
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v476/bigmike8069/?action=view&current=ea7db21f.pbr

Thanks,
Mike

Patrick Donnelly
09-15-2007, 06:10 PM
Re: 205x5
You only hit parallel. You have to go a bit deeper.

Re: 225x5
Wouldn't play for me...

Mike Groth
09-16-2007, 04:15 AM
Yeah I know I need to go deeper on the 205...thats why I used a ball to squat to on the 225 round. I still have a problem knowing when to stop without using a medicine ball to squat to. Maybe its because Im tall (6'4'') but it always feels like Im going deeper than I actually am. Im not sure why the second video wont play it works for me.

Jonathan Thomas Powers
09-16-2007, 04:25 AM
I would go a bit slower, you can see the momentum as you lower yourself down, you are also leaning forward as well. Put the two together and you can see where you start to rock forward messing up the trajectory. You can see this on your last Squat in both vids. Looks like all the weight is on your toes.

Bring your chest up get your elbows under the bar and stay in control on the way down. I would work on this first, then increase your ROM.

It's hard to tell from the video, but it looks like your knee is tracking on the inside of your foot. (knees pinching in when you come up) Very hard to tell, but if you look at your knee in relation to your ankle the knee looks like its inside of it.

Brandon Oto
09-16-2007, 05:18 AM
Yes, slow it down, keep it controlled. You're basically dropping into it.

Leonid Soubbotine
09-19-2007, 02:43 PM
Looks like your midback is a little relaxed (noticeable on the 205 video).

Depth issue solved by med ball.

Jason M Struck
09-24-2007, 06:24 AM
-elbows forward or under the bar
-chest forward
-chin up/look up

try the front squat with light weight, and pursue more depth. See if this helps your posture. If not, mobilize the hips. Pull the heads of your femurs out of the sockets. Imagine your upper legs as a "V". your coccyx is the point, and your feet the tops.

stretches
hip flexor
frog stretch
piriformis

Ahmik Jones
09-30-2007, 10:22 AM
I would go a bit slower, you can see the momentum as you lower yourself down, you are also leaning forward as well. Put the two together and you can see where you start to rock forward messing up the trajectory. You can see this on your last Squat in both vids. Looks like all the weight is on your toes.

Bring your chest up get your elbows under the bar and stay in control on the way down. I would work on this first, then increase your ROM.

It's hard to tell from the video, but it looks like your knee is tracking on the inside of your foot. (knees pinching in when you come up) Very hard to tell, but if you look at your knee in relation to your ankle the knee looks like its inside of it.

You are right about the knee, and the fact that his weight was on his toes for one of the reps. However, the stuff about keeping your elbows under the bar is not only counter productive it is dangerous. keeping your elbows high in back keeps the weight on your back keeps the weight from causing elbow tendonitis. If your elbow are under the bar, the weight will be sitting on your spine. With your elbows up in back and your shoulder blades together, you create an shelf for the bar below the spines of your scapulas that allows the bar to rest on muscle rather than bone.

Yes, slow it down, keep it controlled. You're basically dropping into it.

There is no reason to go any slower on the way down than what you can stop at the bottom. Not only does this keep you from taking advantage of the stretch reflex at the bottom, it wastes energy that you could be using to get the weight back up.

-elbows forward or under the bar
-chest forward
-chin up/look up

try the front squat with light weight, and pursue more depth. See if this helps your posture. If not, mobilize the hips. Pull the heads of your femurs out of the sockets. Imagine your upper legs as a "V". your coccyx is the point, and your feet the tops.

stretches
hip flexor
frog stretch
piriformis

Your critique is completely incorrect. The "back" squat is a back exercise. See above for how keeping your elbows under the bar is dangerous and counter productive. Keeping your chest up is a good thing, but from your context, I can tell that you dont mean shoulderblades together and back arched, you are referring to keeping his back more upright. This would be appropriate if he was doing a front squat or an air squat, but is inappropriate for the low back position back squat that he is performing.

Now for the worst part of your critique the chin up/look up. First off, why would you keep appropriate anatomic position with your lumbar and thoracix spine and then put your cervical spine in exagerated extension. This not only leads to poor balance in every lift, not just the back squat, it is dangerous to do when you have 200 lbs on your back. Try this: Do a set of 5 back squats with a fairly light weight, around 135 lbs while looking up, then after a rest do the same set looking in an appropriate position, the floor about 15 feet in front of you. See which one feels better.

For all three of you, I appreciate the fact that you are willing to try to help, but I am not sure where you are getting your information. I would recommend the book, Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore.

http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength-Practical-Coaching-Beginners/dp/0976805464/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-0763950-6911816?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191172516&sr=8-1

(work family safe)

It explains all of this much more eloquently than I can, and is the program endorsed by CrossFit for the basic barbell certifications. If you read the book and use what it teaches on yourselves and clients if you are a trainer, you will realize why the critiques above are incorrect and based on myths brought about by the some of the 24 hour fitness types in the past 20 years.